Get a life! 19 things to do instead of staring at a screen

THE QUARANTINE EDITION!

Don’t be like this person.
Photo by William Iven on Unsplash

As a mental health clinician, I am a huge proponent of living a screen-limited life. Too much screen time has been linked to anxiety and depression in teens, and I can’t throw a rock without hitting someone who readily admits that they are addicted to their phones. Screens are not inherently bad, but our relationship to them can become compulsive and unhealthy.

Unfortunately, being stuck inside all day makes it all too easy to spend our entire lives staring at a screen. Stop for a moment and think about how much of today day you spent in front of a screen, whether it was the computer, TV, phone, tablet or something else.

If we want to live a screen-limited life, we need to be intentional about cutting screen time, otherwise, we’ll find ourselves right back at square one. Having a go-to list of alternative behaviors can help interrupt learned behavior and break the screen-addiction cycle.

Here are seventeen quarantine-compliant things to do instead of staring at a screen:

Beading: Make some necklaces or bracelets or door beads or any kind of jewelry or decorations you want. Don’t have a bead store in your town? My my local bead store does free shipping over $35!

Play board games: Dig up your old faves like Candyland, Crossfire or Tales of the Crystals . Thrift stores sell used board games for a few dollars each. Or make up your own original board game and bring it to life using cardboard, markers and other items around the house.

Make a birdhouse out of a milk carton: Or any other kind of material you want. Fill it with birdseed and set it outside. Watch for birds. They’re everywhere.

Make something with clay: Use Sculpey or make your own clay: 1 cup salt, 2 cups flour, ¾ cup of water. (Thanks, Learning4Kids.)

Practice a musical instrument: If you don’t play yet, noodle around with a fun and easy instrument like the harmonica, ukelele or a Casio keyboard. Make noises. Make up songs.

Create a collage: Dig up some old magazines (or newspapers or flyers or books), go through the pages and rip out whatever you instantly connect with. (Don’t think, just rip.) Cut out the parts you want and make a picture, or decorate an object like a box or a piece of furniture.

Take a walk: Gawk at the splendor of the natural world. Explore a street you’ve never been on before. People-watch.

Move Your Furniture: Rearrange your living space. Put the sofa on the opposite side of the room. Make the bed face the window instead of the door. Switch up the energy in your home.

Revamp Your Workspace: Clear your workspace, wipe off all the dust and cat/dog/Yeti fur. Return only half of the items that were there before to the desk (or fewer). Bring in one new object that makes you smile.

Write longhand: Writing doesn’t have to be typed to be sacred or important. Remember writing by hand in school? Get a pen and journal about your day or your crush on Benedict Cumberbatch. Write an old fashioned letter to a friend. They’ll be psyched to receive something real in a digital world.

Get a jump start on your most epic Halloween costume yet: Create an original costume with nothing but the materials you have at home and your innate costume-making skills. You may surprise yourself with the results.

Coloring books: Ha! I bet you thought I’d recommend adult coloring books, just like everyone else and their mom! (If you like adult coloring books, please continue to enjoy them.) My special twist on this is: make your own coloring books. Draw some pictures by hand on a blank piece of paper. Make it as simple or intricate as you want. Then color it. (Or have someone else color it. Or not.)

Read: A (literal) book. Many libraries have curbside pickup during Covid-19, so all you have to do is put a hold on your items and pick them up once they’ve been collected. If you don’t want to use the internet to reserve your books, you can always call and talk to a real person.

Call a friend and catch up: Forget Zoom, Facetime and Skype. Hearing another person’s voice on the other end of a phone is sacred in its own way.

Organize your closet: By color, season, practicality, you name it. Set up some outfits for your fall wardrobe. The autumn equinox was just yesterday (September 22), so hop to it!

Meditate: It’s 2020, you knew I’d suggest this. You don’t need an app, a video or a livestreamed sermon to meditate. Sit with both feet on the floor. Close or open your eyes. Bring your attention to your breath, going in and out. When your mind wanders to other things, bring your attention back to your breath. Congratulations, you’ve meditated.

Play with hair wax: You’re not living your best quarantine life until you’ve got the hair to prove it.

Learn a new dish: Use an actual cookbook. Maybe one you picked up at your local library?

Mess around with makeup: Practice a look you haven’t tried out in real life. Paint your face any way you want. Go crazy. Make up your own rules. Just for fun.

In creating this list, I realized that almost all of the items could involve the use of screens if desired: YouTube tutorials, online instructions, digital books, meditation apps, Zoom, Pinterest, and so on. This is part of why being intentional about performing these activities in a screen-limited (or even screen-absent) manner before jumping in is so important. For many of us, it has simply become a reflex to reach for Google or our phones to complete our daily activities. But remember that not so long ago we lived in an age where we didn’t have any of these things…and we were just fine.

Now it’s time for you to share your suggestions with me. What are your favorite, non-screen-related activities? How do you feel when you spend a little less of your day staring at a screen?

You Can Choose Who You Want to Be Friends With (Yes, Really.)

When determining whether to pursue a romantic relationship, people often tend towards vigilance, looking out for signs of “red flags,” “settling” and indicators of incompatibility or “deal breakers.” When it comes to friendship, however, many of us take a much more relaxed approach.

We know it’s important to choose our friends wisely. My grandmother always instructed me: “Show me who your friends are, and I’ll show you who you are.” The motivational speaker Jim Rohn said: “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” And then there’s the well-known Japanese proverb: “When the character of a man is not clear to you, look at his friends.” The truth is, the company we keep shapes who we are, what we feel, believe, and the choices we make.

But sometimes we lose track of the idea that we can choose who we want to be friends with, just as we can choose to with whom to pursue a romantic relationship.

If you are looking to bring more intention to your friendships, it may be helpful to approach making friends like dating. This can include:

  • knowing what you want in a friendship beforehand and the kind of friend you are
  • practicing being a good friend to yourself (i.e. loving yourself) first and foremost
  • taking the time to get to know a new person and using this time to assess whether you even want to pursue a friendship with them (and whether they really want a friendship with you, as well)
  • being willing to keep looking and move on if you determine that you and another person aren’t a good “match”

It’s important to remember that, as with dating and partnerships, we can have standards. We don’t have to participate in any given friendship or relationship that comes our way…

…even if the other party wants us to.

…even if we’re lonely.

…and even if the other person “looks great on paper.”

Your feelings and needs matter.

You can choose who you want to be friends with.

(Yes, really.)

What Kind of Friend are YOU? Take the Quiz & Find Out!

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This site is for informational purposes only. It isn’t intended to diagnose or treat any mental health problems and is not intended as psychological advice.
© 2020 Gina Davis, PsyD. All rights reserved.

Secure Attachment in Friendships

Photo by Alicia Jones on Unsplash

There are four relationship attachment styles:

Anxious, Avoidant, Fearful, and Secure.

In my last three posts, I discussed how anxious, avoidant, and fearful attachment styles can show up in the context of friendship.

In today’s post, I’ll discuss the secure attachment style in friendship.

Secure Attachment & Friendship:

Secure friends are comfortable being emotionally intimate and conveying interest and affection, but are also comfortable being independent and self-reliant. They conduct their interpersonal relationships with healthy boundaries.

How Does a Secure Attachment Develop?

The concept of attachment styles comes from Attachment Theory, originated by psychoanalyst John Bowlby. Attachment Theory examines the relationship between a child and their parent or primary caregiver, and explains how a child’s attachment to their parent or caregiver impacts the child’s behavior in other relationships in life, such as with partners or friends.

A person may develop a secure attachment style if during childhood they experienced their parent or primary caregivers as consistently available to provide soothing and comfort when needed, balanced with support and freedom to explore and master their environment.

In the case of secure attachment, the parent/caregiver was neither overly-enmeshed or dependent on the child, nor were they frightening or inconsistently available (physically, emotionally, or otherwise). Instead, a person with secure attachment experienced the confidence and security that comes from knowing that they have a consistent, caring and supportive caregiver to whom they could turn for comfort and encouragement when needed, and who also gave them the freedom to explore and build confidence in terms of their own relationship to the world.

A securely attached person tends to view both themselves and others in a positive and competent light. They feel that they can get their needs met and are not easily threatened by the demands of relationships or other major areas of life.

A securely attached individual will usually be able to quickly discern whether a person or prospective relationship lacks the fundamentals of healthy relating (such as care, trust, respect, consistency), and will likely choose not to invest their time and energy if these fundamentals are not present.

In a relationship, a securely attached person will not allow their friend or partner to consume or dominate their lives; they are comfortable with a healthy balance of intimacy and independence.

If you identify as securely attached, here are some tips for staying on a secure path:

  • Remember that just because you are able to get along with many different types of people doesn’t mean you are obligated to be everyone’s friend. If you are not happy in a friendship, especially after having tried to make things work, it is okay to step back.
  • If you start to feel jealous, distrusting, worried, reluctant to express your honest feelings, or notice yourself holding back or playing games in a friendship, take this as a big red flag that this might not be a healthy friendship for you.
  • If you experience or have experienced the loss of a friendship, remind yourself that your belief system isn’t to blame, and focus on taking extra good care of yourself while you heal.

Do you have personal experience with a secure attachment style in friendships or other relationships? Feel free to share in the comments.

What’s YOUR friendship attachment style? Take the quiz and find out!

Sources:

Levine, A. & Heller, R. Attached (2010). New York, NY: Penguin.

“How to Cultivate a Secure Attachment With Your Child” by Diana Divecha: https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_cultivate_a_secure_attachment_with_your_child

Website Privacy Policy I Website Terms & Conditions I Website Disclaimer
This site is for informational purposes only. It isn’t intended to diagnose or treat any mental health problems and is not intended as psychological advice.
© 2020 Gina Davis, PsyD. All rights reserved.

Fearful Attachment in Friendships

Julia Roberts as a bride with a fearful attachment style in Runaway Bride.

There are four relationship attachment styles:

Anxious, Avoidant, Fearful, and Secure.

In my last two posts, I discussed anxious attachment and avoidant attachment styles in friendship.

In today’s post, I’ll discuss the fearful attachment style and how it show up within the context of friendship.

Fearful Attachment in Friendship:

Have you ever been told you “send mixed signals”, are “hot and cold” or that you behave in ways that others find confusing?

Friends with a fearful attachment style yearn for quality relationships, but fear them at the same time. They understand the value of relationships, but also feel threatened by interpersonal closeness, perceiving it as unsafe.

In short, having a fearful attachment style means that you want relationships with people, but are also afraid of relationships with people.

This type of attachment style makes it difficult for people to get close to the fearfully attached person, even if closeness is something they consciously desire.

How Does a Fearful Attachment Develop?

The concept of attachment styles comes from Attachment Theory, originated by psychoanalyst John Bowlby. Attachment Theory examines the relationship between a child and their parent or primary caregiver, and explains how a child’s attachment to their parent or caregiver impacts the child’s behavior in other relationships in life, such as with partners or friends.

A person may develop a fearful attachment relationship style if they experienced fear caused by the outside environment (as is to be expected) and sought soothing or comfort from a parent who themselves responded in a manner that also produced fear in the child.

The parent in question may have yelled at, abused, or otherwise frightened the child seeking soothing, making the parent – the needed source of comfort and reassurance – as scary if not scarier than the original fear-producing stimulus.

As a result, a fearfully attached child has nowhere to turn: they cannot escape the fears produced by their environment, and they cannot depend on their caregiver to soothe them. In fact, the parent’s frightening response to the child’s need for soothing may in fact exacerbate the child’s fears and anxieties. With nowhere else to turn, however, the child in this scenario may attempt again and again to seek comfort from their frightening parent, trapping them in a painful cycle of anxiety and unmet needs.

A fearfully attached person tends to view both themselves and others negatively. They may consciously desire and seek out close relationships, but become overwhelmed and uncomfortable when those relationships start to become a reality. At this point, they may push others away, fearing, on some primal level, for their safety. They tend to be on edge at all times, waiting for threats in the relationship to surface or for “the other shoe to drop.” Others may perceive their behavior as “hot and cold” ” and express confusion when the person who initially pursued closeness with them suddenly withdraws, rejects and needs space.

If this sounds familiar, and you are ready to work on shifting your fearful attachment style, here are some suggestions for next steps:

  • Get honest with yourself about your needs in a friendship. Try to accept these needs and yourself with compassion and non-judgement.
  • Use mindfulness to recognize your tendency to view yourself negatively. Use thought records to challenge these negative views of yourself.
  • Similarly, use mindfulness and thought records to recognize and challenge your tendency to interpret others’ behavior negatively. Unless your friends provide you with concrete evidence to the contrary, practice assuming that have positive intentions.
  • Make a list of the things you like and love about yourself. Remind yourself on a consistent basis of the reasons why someone would want you as their friend.
  • Learn how to recognize when someone is safe a safe person to be vulnerable with. This infographic provides some basic tips.
  • Additionally, learn how to recognize when someone may NOT be a safe person to be vulnerable with. This article provides some of the signs to look out for.
  • Explore what healthy activities help you self-soothe when you’re emotionally triggered. Here is a list with some self-soothing activity suggestions. It is important to practice these self-care activities when you aren’t triggered, so you can more easily access them when you are triggered.
  • Try to focus on mutual collaboration and meeting each other’s needs in your friendships. Reflect on how you can give support to your friends, and how you would like to receive support from them.
  • When you feel a relationship getting closer and start to experience the desire to pull away, name this impulse as an expected part of your pattern in interpersonal relationships, and challenge yourself to sit with the discomfort of increasing closeness instead of immediately acting on it by withdrawing from the relationship.

Do you have personal experience with a fearful attachment style in friendships or other relationships? Feel free to share in the comments.

In my next post, I will discuss the secure attachment style and how it manifests in friendships.

What’s YOUR friendship attachment style? Take the quiz and find out!

Sources:

Levine, A. & Heller, R. Attached (2010). New York, NY: Penguin.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-freedom-change/201505/come-here-go-away-the-dynamics-fearful-attachment

Website Privacy Policy I Website Terms & Conditions I Website Disclaimer
This site is for informational purposes only. It isn’t intended to diagnose or treat any mental health problems and is not intended as psychological advice.
© 2020 Gina Davis, PsyD. All rights reserved.

Avoidant Attachment in Friendship

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

There are four relationship attachment styles:

Anxious, Avoidant, Fearful, and Secure

In my last post, I wrote about anxious attachment in friendship. This week, I’ll discuss the avoidant attachment style and how it manifests within the context of friendship.

Avoidant Attachment in Friendship:

Have you ever been told you have “a wall up” been called “aloof” or “a lone wolf”?

Avoidant friends are very independent, self-reliant, and generally uncomfortable getting close to others. They tend to lead more with logic than their emotions, and may complain that their friends are “needy” or “clingy” when trying to get closer to them. 

This type of friendship attachment style can make it difficult for people to get close to you, causing you to lose or sabotage friendships that might otherwise have brought enjoyment and connection to both parties. Others may interpret your behavior as rejecting, discarding, or taking their friendship for granted.

How Does an Avoidant Attachment Develop?

The concept of attachment styles comes from Attachment Theory, a psychological theory originated by psychoanalyst John Bowlby that examines the relationship between a child and their parent or primary caregiver, and explains how a child’s attachment to their parent or caregiver impacts the child’s behavior in other relationships in life, such as partnership or friendship.

A person may develop an avoidant attachment relationship style if their parent or caregiver struggled themselves to cope with or tolerate their child’s emotional needs and responded by closing themselves off emotionally from their child.

The parent in question may have ignored, shamed, rejected or otherwise communicated strong negative messages to their child when they showed emotions or expressed a desire for connection, given them too much space for independence and self-reliance, or failed to comfort and reassure the child when they experienced distress or fear.

As a result, the child tends to hide or suppress their need for relationships, often appearing outwardly independent. They have learned to rely primarily if not only on themselves for reassurance and emotional regulation, to repress their emotions and avoid reaching out for healthy interpersonal connections. In fact, they may actively work to avoid close relationships, due to the core belief that they don’t or shouldn’t need others.

If this sounds familiar, and you are ready to work on changing your avoidant attachment style, here are some suggestions for next steps:

  • Don’t completely lose your independent style, but try to focus more on mutual collaboration in your friendships. Reflect on how you can give support to your friends, and how you would like to receive support from them.
  • Recognize and challenge your tendency to interpret others’ behavior negatively. Unless your friends give you concrete evidence to the contrary, assume that they have positive intentions.
  • Remind yourself on a regular basis about why you chose your friends. What positive qualities drew you to them? Why are you grateful for them? It may feel easier to abandon ship when your desires to withdraw set in, but try to recognize this as part of the pattern your’re trying to break. Stay the course and give yourself time to learn about the advantages of secure friendships.
  • Practice mindfulness to help yourself recognize when the impulse to distance or avoid is getting activated. A great place to start is with mindfulness mediation. You can also practice mindfulness to help yourself identify when the inner voice that tells you to pull away or jumps to negative conclusions about closeness with others is speaking. Complete thought records to challenge these thoughts.
  • When people give you feedback that suggests that they feel can’t get close to you, try to listen with compassion for yourself and for them instead of putting up walls, engaging in toxic amounts of self-blame, or withdrawing further.

Do you have personal experience with an avoidant attachment style in friendships or other relationships? Feel free to share in the comments.

In my next post, I will discuss the fearful attachment style and how it manifests in friendships.

What’s YOUR friendship attachment style? Take the quiz and find out!

Sources:

Levine, A. & Heller, R. Attached (2010). New York, NY: Penguin.

https://www.healthline.com/health/parenting/avoidant-attachment#what-does-it-look-like

Website Privacy Policy I Website Terms & Conditions I Website Disclaimer
This site is for informational purposes only. It isn’t intended to diagnose or treat any mental health problems and is not intended as psychological advice.
© 2020 Gina Davis, PsyD. All rights reserved.

Anxious Attachment in Friendship

Photo by Anthony Tran on Unsplash

There are four relationship attachment styles: Anxious, Avoidant, Fearful, and Secure.

Over the next few weeks, I am going to discuss the four different attachment styles, starting with Anxious attachment, and discuss how each attachment style manifests, specifically within the context of friendship.

Anxious Attachment in Friendship:

Have you ever been told that you are “needy”, “suffocating”, “clingy” or “controlling” as a friend?

Anxious friends feel a stronger need for emotional intimacy in their friendships. If you have an anxious attachment style, you may require regular reassurance from friends that they care about you, aren’t mad at you, and won’t close the door on you. You may also find yourself feeling jealous or threatened by a friend developing a new interest, or starting another friendship or relationship.

This type of friendship attachment style can create internal and interpersonal problems, as behaviors stemming from your insecurities about relationships can be interpreted by others as controlling or overly demanding.

How Does an Anxious Attachment Develop?

The concept of attachment styles comes from Attachment Theory, a psychological theory originated by psychoanalyst John Bowlby that examines the relationship between a child and their parent or primary caregiver, and explains how a child’s attachment to their parent or caregiver impacts the child’s behavior in other relationships in life, such as partnership or friendship.

A person may develop an anxious attachment relationship style if their caregiver or parent struggled to maintain healthy boundaries within the parent-child relationship.

A parent may have been overly-enmeshed with their child, not giving them enough room to develop their own identities apart from the parent. We sometimes see this in the form of helicopter parenting, a parent attempting to live vicariously through their child, or depending too much emotionally on a child for their own comfort and self-regulation.

As a result, the child comes to associate relationships later on in life with high amounts of enmeshment, finding that they need copious amounts of reassurance and communication. They may even feel panicked or despair when they perceive rejection from a friend or other relationship partner.

If this sounds familiar, and you are ready to work on changing your anxious attachment style, here are some suggestions for next steps:

  • Make an honest list of your needs in a friendship. Try to accept and not judge yourself for having these needs.
  • Reflect on whether existing and/or new friends can realistically meet your needs. If not, acknowledge that this may simply by a matter of friendship incompatibility, and not a reflection on you or your self-worth.
  • Speaking of self-worth, people with anxious attachment styles may have a tendency to experience feelings of insecurity, or engage in a lot of self-criticism and/or self-blame. Use mindfulness to recognize when your critical inner voice is speaking to you, and complete thought records to challenge these automatic negative thoughts.
  • Create a self-soothing practice. As alluded to above, anxious attachment styles in relationships can stem from a parent not having the skills and tools to cope with their own separation anxiety. If this is a pattern that has been passed down, you can be the one to break the chain by learning skills to soothe, calm and comfort yourself. A great place to start is with mindfulness mediation.
  • Give “calm” friendships a chance. The lack of drama and/or high emotions might feel boring to you at first, but stay the course and give yourself time to learn about the advantages of secure, consistent friendships.

Do you have personal experience with an anxious attachment style in friendships or other relationships? Please feel free to share in the comments.

Next week, I will discuss avoidant attachment style and how it manifests in friendships.

What’s YOUR friendship attachment style? Take the quiz and find out!

Source: Levine, A. & Heller, R. Attached (2010). New York, NY: Penguin.

Website Privacy Policy I Website Terms & Conditions I Website Disclaimer
This site is for informational purposes only. It isn’t intended to diagnose or treat any mental health problems and is not intended as psychological advice.
© 2020 Gina Davis, PsyD. All rights reserved.

Have You Connected With Someone Today?

Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash

I live in the San Francisco Bay Area, and as you may know, my hometown has been ordered to shelter-in-place until at least April 7. We’re the first in the country to do this.

I’m not going to lie. This is a scary and uncertain time. Over the past week, I’ve observed (and experienced) intense fear, sadness and grief. I’ve also observed (and experienced) amazing optimism, patience, kindness, strength and generosity in myself and others.

In addition, I’m seeing that people are figuring out different ways to be together, apart. 

For example:

  • Over the past few days, I have talked to friends and family members I haven’t spoken with or seen in months.
  • People in Italy are singing with each other from their balconies
  • I’ve engaged (while six feet apart, of course) with people I’ve encountered outside my home. We’ve listened to one another. We’ve laughed together. We’ve shared hopes, opinions, advice and fears. 
  • My local exercise studio has put their classes online so we can still work out together, from home.
  • My best friend and I started sending short videos back and forth on the app Marco Polo (which honestly I didn’t know existed before yesterday), seeing who can make the other person laugh harder.

Although we’ve all been told to practice social distancing, it doesn’t mean we have to be disconnected from one another. 

In fact, this is an incredible opportunity. An opportunity to figure out what real connection means to each of us, and to learn how to bring this connection into our lives when it matters most. 

How do you like to feel connected? Do you like to reach out to your loved ones, or do you prefer that someone to reach out to you? Do you like a little conversation followed by a break and some solitude, or chatting continuously throughout the day? Do you want to talk about what’s going on, or do you want to stick to the non-virus topics for the time being? Ask for what you need, and ask other people what they need. Be honest. Meet somewhere in between.

Whatever it looks like, take some time today to seek out a connection. Just one. Your friends, your family, your coworkers, your neighbors…you never know who might be feeling really scared or alone, who might desperately need to connect with someone but for whatever reason feel that they can’t.

If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis and need to talk to someone right now, reach out to Crisis Text Line. Volunteers are available 24/7 to listen and help, for free.

Like the virus itself, we’re not taking these social distancing precautions just to protect ourselves, but to protect each other. Because we’re a community, and the success of a community relies on everyone working together. Even when we’re apart.

PS: If you like meditation and want a free guided mediation for anxious thoughts emailed to you, click here for one I made several months ago. It’s free. 

“Sometimey” Friends

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What are we to do about “sometimey” friends?

I learned the term “sometimey friends” from my grandmother many years ago. The definition is pretty self-explanatory, but for the sake of this blog post:

A sometimey friend is a friend who is…sometimes your friend and…sometimes not.

A friend who sometimes wants to hang out and sometimes doesn’t even text you back.

A friend who sometimes makes you feel like their bff and sometimes ditches you for someone else.

As opposed to fair-weather friends, a sometimey friend’s presence in your life is not solely contingent on how well or badly things are going for you. The sometimey friend’s pattern of closeness (and distance) is unique to that particular sometimey individual.

As most of us have learned, there are many different levels and nuances when it comes to the umbrella of friendship. In theory, there is nothing wrong with having – or being – a sometimey friend.

Problems are likely to arise, however, when your expectations and desires conflict with reality (or another person’s expectations and desires).

If you’re expecting a sometimey friend to be a consistent best friend forever? There are going to be issues.

Conversely, if you want a friendship you can generally dip in and out of and your friends are expecting you to show up consistently and be ride-or-die? There are going to be issues.

There is power in being honest with yourself and others about the type of friendships you want, the type of friendships you are able to offer, and the the things you need in order to feel valued and fulfilled in a friendship.

As in the dating process, it helps if all parties can be honest and communicative about these things initially, as well as on an ongoing basis.

But as we know, this doesn’t always happen.

Instead, we often have to observe others, ourselves and the situation, come to our own conclusions about what is going on, be honest with ourselves and ask:

If this never changes, can I accept it?

There is nothing wrong with deciding that you cannot. Sometimes you just aren’t looking for the same things as someone else.

There is also nothing wrong with accepting a sometimey friend for who they are, if you are okay with having this type of friend in your life. If, for example, you have several close friends and are comfortable including a couple of sometimey friends in the mix, you can enjoy that setup if it works for you.

Be a good friend to yourself first, and start by being honest with yourself about what you want, need, and are able to offer another person. Don’t be afraid or ashamed of the answers. There is power in your truth, and it takes bravery and a healthy amount of self-love to embrace it.

What kind of friend are YOU? Take the quiz and find out!

The Challenges of Adult Friendships

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I do a lot of clinical work with middle school students. Friendship is a major component of life in middle school, and in both my clinical and personal experience, friendship at this stage of life is usually accompanied by a LOT of ups and downs.

There are dramas, fights, hurt feelings, competition, mean-spirited rumors, cliques, people who are best friends one day and enemies the next. Friends who slowly fade away. Friends who are not sincere. Research suggests that one half of middle school friendships will last less than one academic year.

I talk a lot with the middle school students I work with about learning what makes a good friend – how to recognize one, and how to be one. Oftentimes, this handout, Cactus & Flower Friends by plantlovegrow.com, serves as a really helpful guide to starting a conversation with students about this topic.

It’s almost a given that preteen and teenage friendships are destined for choppy waters.

But by adulthood, we’re supposed to have put all (or at least most of) the interpersonal drama behind us and learned all the ins and outs of healthy friendship. Our younger years were supposed to be rife with unstable and tumultuous friendships…not our twenties, thirties, or beyond.

Still, many of the adults I’ve worked with have shared that they continue to face challenges in the arena of friendship. Less often due to rumors and cliques, and more because of issues such as:

  • limited time for friends due to work
  • limited energy to invest in friendships
  • partnership and/or kids consuming time that could otherwise be spent cultivating friendships
  • being new to an area and not knowing anyone
  • feeling that they’ve outgrown existing friendships
  • feeling that by adulthood, everyone already has their friend group “set” and aren’t looking for new ones

Friendship-related challenges DO continue past adolescence and into adulthood, they just have a different appearance.

It’s important for us to talk about the challenges of adult friendships and how to overcome them. After all, just because you aren’t a teenager anymore, doesn’t mean friendship ceases to be an incredibly important part of a fulfilling life.

If you’re reading this and wanting to take inventory of your current friends situation, I recommend starting with the same handout I use with middle school students. You can use it to begin an objective conversation with yourself (or maybe…a friend?) about healthy and unhealthy friendships. Share any insights you had while doing this exercise in the comments below. You can also take my quiz to see what kind of friendship attachment style you have:

What kind of friend are YOU? Take the quiz and find out!

I’ll be talking more about overcoming the challenges of adult friendships in the coming weeks, so join my email list to get notified of new posts.

How Connected Are You, Really?

Photo by Gigi on Unsplash

Years ago (circa 2010), I resisted buying a smart phone because I didn’t want to feel too “connected” to others. I didn’t want to see my emails as they arrived in my inbox all day long. I didn’t want to be able to browse Facebook while I rode the BART train. Having a cell phone on my person at all times was connection enough.

Now, it’s normal to be online at all times, to be reachable 24/7. In many cases, it’s what’s expected of us.

In 2013, I caved and got my first smart phone. Now, I can’t imagine life without it. I’m sure I’m not alone in saying that.

Social media, telephones, email, DMs, Instagram, FaceTime, text messages, smoke signals, The Internet…

They were all created so we could connect more easily with one another. No matter the distance. Or the time zone.

But how connected are we…really?

According to the Health Resource & Services Administration: “Two in five Americans report that they sometimes or always feel their social relationships are not meaningful, and one in five say they feel lonely or socially isolated.”

In 2020, we have more ways than ever of staying in touch and connected with our loved ones. Why, then, have rates of loneliness doubled in the past fifty years?

The answer is likely multifaceted, but I wonder if part of it has to do with the quality versus quantity of connection.

In my work as a clinical psychologist – as well as, you know, being a person in the world – I’ve encountered so many people who say that they feel overwhelmed and actually stressed out by all the different methods of communication at our disposal. Instead of interpersonal connection being a source of emotional replenishment, relaxation, and just plain fun, it’s begun to feel more like a job. Another item to check off our already-packed to-do lists. AKA High quantity.

In addition, although advances in technology have made makes it easier for us to communicate, I’m sure I’m not alone in noticing that it has also allowed our communication with one another to become…briefer. People used to write each other long letters. Then it was long phone calls. After that, long (by today’s standards) emails. Then, posts on each other’s social media walls/feeds. Now, instead of commenting on someone’s post, we click and there’s a like, heart, laugh, cry, or angry emoji to replace a conversation. A quick acknowledgement, designed to say: “I see you.” “I hear you.” “I agree with you.” “That’s funny.” “That makes me angry.” “That makes me sad.” AKA Lower quality.

Tons of messages and notifications may be coming in all day every day, but in 2020, present, mindful, engaged communication and connection is becoming harder to find.

If what I’ve written so far resonates with you, or even if it doesn’t, I have some questions for you:

When was the last time you experienced meaningful connection/communication with another person?

What do you think made this possible?

What do YOU need to feel you’ve connected in a meaningful way with another person?

How do you make the many means of connection (email, text, phone, social media, etc.) work for you without becoming overwhelmed?

Though liking and sharing these blog posts is always welcomed, in the spirit of examining communication, I challenge you to write a short (or long) comment below, sharing your answers to one, two, or all of the questions above. I’d love to read what you have to say and respond to you (yes, you).

PS: Friendship is such an incredible antidote to feelings of loneliness and disconnection. What kind of friend are YOU? Take the quiz and find out!